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The Tri Shop, with the help of David Bertrand, hosts an Expert Series. Two weeks ago, they tried to get Jamie Turner in for their 5 year anniversary weekend in November, but he was only available yesterday. It was very last minute, so in all fairness, not all of the local coaches who wanted to make it were able to. The DFW Tri Club was lucky that three of us (Coaches Lyndsi & Scott) were available for it (at the expense of a Transition & Flat Tire Clinic). For those who don’t know who Jamie Turner is… he just coached Gwen Jorgensen to Gold in Rio. Rare is it that we can get someone of this caliber into our area to speak. More rare is the timing shortly after a gold medal. With that, thanks are also due to our friends at Red Bull for helping facilitate it.

Although the talk was geared to coaches, some key takeaways I’d like to share with athletes are:

1) Compromise is the enemy of a successful athlete. Note, I think compromise in social situations is very important. But when it comes to sports, if you want to be successful, set your standards high and then minimize compromising.

2) Perceived competence is more important that actual ability in encouraging continuing participation in sports.

3) The athlete does the first 75% of the work. The person does the last 25%. In other words, it comes down to their character.

4) If you have to choose between strategy and character, be without strategy.

5) It is very difficult to teach discipline once you are grown up. If you have good habits, you are more likely to be successful. Examples of the habits he talked about, do you make your bed every morning, do you pick up after yourself?

6) Celebrate winning. The little wins and big ones. This point is interesting timing for me. I also have been listening to an audio book – Taking People With You, by David Novak, former CEO of Yum! Brands (very pertinent to me, since I also work in the restaurant industry). He was also talking about celebrating the small victories. Stephanie, when you won your age group recently, I advised you not to celebrate, since you have a bigger goal you’re aiming for. Reflecting on this, perhaps a celebration was due… we just need to figure out how to celebrate within the confines of discipline. Deal?

7) Journal the Power of 3 every day
3 things to keep doing
3 things to start doing
3 things to stop doing
-Try adding this to your nightly list. Perhaps when you are rolling out or in your recovery ice or warm Epsom bath; reflect and grow. 3 too hard? Start with 2.

Now this is all applicable to those of you with performance goals but if you are training and racing for fun, don’t confuse the above with me preaching that you need to get faster -coaches want to help you achieve and maximize your goals, whatever they are. The great thing about all of this is, maybe it doesn’t pertain to your athletic goals, but it certainly can and should be applied to what is important to you. In other words, reread that from the frame of your career’s perspective and again from your family’s perspective.

Happy training!